Monday, July 20, 2015

I Just Posted Five Minutes of Some Guy Fixing Donald Fagen's Fender Rhodes on My Blog

That was it. That right there. That's it. That was me posting like five minutes of some guy fixing Donald Fagen's Fender Rhodes. But it's just, like, some guy. It's Donald Fagen's Fender Rhodes. He's not Donald Fagen. He's not Donald Fagen at all. Not even a little. I don't even think he's the guy that fixed Donald Fagen's Fender Rhodes. You know, the 1973 Fender Suitcase 88 that Donald Fagen owns. He was just hanging around handy, ready to play it for no reason. Me? I was alive and walking the Earth in 1973, and now I hear a Fender Rhodes of that vintage needs fixing. I mean, I couldn't drive, or drink beer, or anything, but I was alive. I couldn't drive and drink beer, either. Either one, or both together. For those of you younger than Donald Fagen's Fender Suitcase 88, driving and drinking hasn't always been a crime. It used to be an activity. Now it's worse than Hitler. And Hitler couldn't even play the Fender Rhodes, so I'm not sure why I brought it up. He did have some 88s built for him, but they were anti-aircraft guns, not electric pianos. They were a little heavy in the bass register, as I recall. The anti-aircraft guns, not the pianos. The pianos sound just fine in the bass register. Well, they do after you fix them. If they're old, I mean. If you fix them because they're old, and then play them, even though you didn't fix them, and you don't own them, they sound good anyway.


Leslie said...

Hey, 19(73).

chasmatic said...

I always liked the Wurlitzer electric pianos. These guys did too:

Ray Charles, Joe Zawinul, Rick Davies, Roger Hodgson, Richard Carpenter, Richard Tandy, Robert Lamm, Nicky Hopkins, Earl van Dyke, Elton John, Billy Joel, Christine McVie, Jeff Lynne, IanMcLagan, Michael Omartian, Larry Knechtel, Booker T. Jones, Garth Porter, John Deacon, Bill Payne, Ray Manzarek, John Medeski,
Edward Van Halen (run through a phlanger and overdriven guitar amp for the intro to "And the Cradle will Rock")

Most of 'em, I've heard or heard of.

Anonymous said...

But can he learn to work the saxophone?

chasmatic said...

Anon: if you open up that door, why not accordions? Or theremins?

Larry Geiger said...

I had a theremin. Ordered it from somewhere. Assembled it. Never knew what to do with it. My brothers thought it was cool. Now where did that cotton picking thing go? Can't seem to find it.

Now a while back Sip linked a video with a guy in the back playing accordion with some other guys (guitar and bass?). It was cool. I never knew.

Sam L. said...

I believe the lit'ry set calls this kind of writing the "stream of unconsciousness".

Larry, I had a somewhereelsemin. Thought I knew where I put it, but it wasn't there.

DAMN! Now I've caught it.

chasmatic said...


I don't believe I want to be that civilized, but thank you anyway. - Hoot Gibson.

Bob said...

Let me just say, very nice.

Anonymous said...

I think I just lost my naked lunch. OH WELL, call me deacon blues.

Or not.

Cachinnosus said...


SippicanCottage said...

Hi Cachinnosus- Thanks for reading and commenting. I just realized that I wrote about that video you offered nine years ago. Nine. And I'd already been writing this blog a year before that. Holy merde.

Like Watching Michelangelo Grind Pigments

Cachinnosus said...

A friend passed your book on to me a couple years ago, and I could see in you a similar search for excellence. You work your words as carefully as you made your furniture (which I have seen first hand).
Fewer and fewer of us know what it means to do a thing excellently, as best we can, day in and day out. Tennyson said it well:
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

SippicanCottage said...

Hi Cachinnosus- Thanks for your kind words about my book and furniture. It is much appreciated.

When I was a grade schooler we read a lot of Tennyson. Longfellow, too. It's out of fashion now, I guess, but it shouldn't be.