Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Exacto Mundo

Back to the cobblers we go. Italian this time.

They're crummy shoes of course; could you imagine shoveling snow with those on? Ridiculous. But then again, who ever heard of an Italian cobbler?


Casey Klahn said...

Italian boots kick culo.

Johnny Glendale said...

@Casey: Lucchese boots'll kick your Italian Boots any day of the week (especially the handmade ones from about 15 years ago before they sold out).

SippicanCottage said...

er.. um... you mean Sam and Cosimo Lucchese, from Sicily?

Not. Sure. If. Serious.

Jonathan Cook said...

As a kid I fondly remember delivering papers to Pileggi's Shoe Repair (Abington, PA). Central casting couldn't have come up with a better Italian cobbler than Mr. Pileggi. I still remember the warm smells of leather and polish in his shop and being enthralled watching him work. I also had several pairs of shoes and boots resoled and -heeled by him - better than the originals every time.

Anonymous said...

You never knew Vito in Rumfid, eh?

SippicanCottage said...

I've only lived in Rumfid for two years, so I don't know that many people. There are lots of paisans here. But Vito is a mystery to me.

Gedaliya said...

The Vuitton shoes are anything but "crummy." The video makes that abundantly clear. They may not be to your taste, but it appears to me they're made of top notch material by craftsmen of the highest skill.

Oh, and I own two pairs of Lucchese Boots.

Gringo said...

This posting on Italian shoes reminded me of an oldie but a goodie:Vuitton-clad Venezuela minister spouts socialism.

Venezuelan Interior Minister Pedro Carreno was momentarily at a loss for words when a journalist interrupted his speech and asked if it was not contradictory to criticize capitalism while wearing Gucci shoes and a tie made by Parisian luxury goods maker Louis Vuitton.

"I don't, uh ... I ... of course," stammered Carreno on Tuesday before regaining his composure. "It's not contradictory because I would like Venezuela to produce all this so I could buy stuff produced here instead of 95 percent of what we consume being imported."

The video clip (here) had been viewed more than 15,000 times on Thursday, a day after it was posted on the YouTube Web site.

For those who speak Spanish, there is a link to the video.

The cobbler in my home area was Mr. Bergeron. Not my hometown, as it was too small to support a cobbler.

The cobbler where I now live is Hispanic, no big surprise in TX. I used his services several months ago. Some may not consider it cost effective. Four years ago I bought some loafers @ $5 at the Salvation Army. I paid $15 for new rubber heels.